Microfiber Cloths Archives

We offer many microfiber cloths! Equipment cleaning, screen, lens, personal hygiene and general purpose cloths.


Microfiber Cloths for Industry

May 15, 2020 | By Mandy Peterson

There are many applications for Photodon Microfiber Cloths in the industrial world.  Cloths for screens, displays, smooth and rough surfaces, or fine and detailed applications. We're confident that you will find the weave to match your needs. We offer several different cloth options for you to choose from. We also offer microfiber promotional options if you'd like to promote your industry in a unique way.

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10 Reasons Why You Should Be Using Microfiber to Clean

April 29, 2020 | By Mandy Peterson

Microfiber cloths:

  • are non-abrasive: Looped microfiber is ideal for gently "buffing" dirt off from delicate surfaces such as glass or screens.
  • are lint-free (in most cases).
  • give a streak-free clean. The average "normal" cleaning rag pushes dust and dirt around, causing smearing.
  • do not scratch surfaces.
  • grab dust/grime particles.
  • soak away liquid (even oil) with fantastic wicking action.
  • become electrostatically charged, which also helps attract/remove dust, hair, and little "fuzzies."
  • dry quickly because of their special loop weave. In fact, this material dries in one-third the time of ordinary cleaning cloths.
  • are absorbent. Microfiber holds up to seven times its weight in liquid. With a couple of firm wrings, this impressive material is ready to mop up until the mess is gone.
  • are washable and reusable (washable up to 500 times).

Flat weave versus looped weave:

Microfiber is a blend of two synthetic material types: polyesters and polyamides, and there are two different ways that microfiber is woven together. One is the "flat" weave and the other is a "looped" weave.

Flat weave: This weave repels water and is used in the textile industry for making water-resistant clothing and accessories such as watchbands. This type of microfiber – and any other type of fabric which is similarly woven –  is not ideal for use as a cleaning cloth since it will only push particles around and not absorb them.

A super-magnified view of flat-woven microfiber.

Looped weave: To be useful for cleaning, microfiber must be separated during processing. This method consists of splitting the polyester (the scrubbing fiber) from the polyamide (the absorbing and quick-drying fiber). Once the microfiber is split, the fibers are woven into a fabric. The percentage of material normally consists of 70% to 80% polyester and 20% to 30% polyamide, depending on the style of fabric construction.

The polyester and polyamide are then combined during weaving to create hundreds of thousands of microscopic "loops." This web-like formation of "loops" grabs dust, grime, dirt, and oil and traps it within the weave, making this material one of the safest cleaning tools to use.  

A super-magnified view of looped weave microfiber.

What makes loop-weaved microfiber so superior for cleaning?

Microfiber cloths are green and eco-friendly because they can be re-washed with a mild detergent in the washing machine and can even be placed into the dryer. Fabric softener should never be used with microfiber cloths because it weakens the static charge of the filaments and reduces the effectiveness.

Also available on the Photodon website:

Sample Cloth Packs for trying a few microfiber cloths without a large commitment.

Silky Microsoft Cleaning Kit

Promotional Microfiber Cloths

Photodon offers many different weaves of microfiber cloths. From cloths to clean lenses and smaller screens to cloths for cleaning larger screens like computer monitors and TVs, there is a microfiber cloth for every purpose. There are also general-purpose cloths that work great on other surfaces.

Please email sales@photodon.com for more information or fill out our quote form for more information.

Different Uses for Microfiber Cloths

April 18, 2020 | By Mandy Peterson

As far as my favorite cleaning tools go, Microfiber Cloths are right up there with my vacuum!

If you missed my last blog: Why you *should* be using Microfiber to clean, take a second to read over what makes a Microfiber Cloth so efficient. Visit our Microfiber Cloths page to learn more.

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Picture of many colors of microfiber cloths

Fascinating Features of Microfiber Cloths

August 6, 2019 | By Mandy Peterson

What is a Microfiber Cloth?

The word "microfiber," as you can imagine, means small fiber.  How small you ask?  I could go on and on using words such as denier, decitex, and micrometers, but who really knows THOSE words?  So instead of making you go to the web (unless you're smarter than me), I’ll put it in layman’s terms:  Most microfibers are about 1/5 of the diameter of a human hair.  These synthetic microfibers are most commonly made from polyester and polyamide.

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Which Microfiber Cloth Should I Choose?

June 29, 2010 | By Mandy Peterson

Often times you hear about how wonderful a microfiber cloth is but seldom do you know exactly what to use it on/for.

You'll find that the biggest key factor when choosing a cloth is the "lint" level of the material. Cloths that are tightly woven or looped woven, normally are a low lint cloth. These are ideal for screen cleaning, or delicate surface cleaning.
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History of Microfiber Cloths: Part 2

April 6, 2010 | By Mandy Peterson

When combined, (microfiber and nylon), result in a microfiber cloth with the advantages of both synthetics. Too much nylon will result in a cloth that will scratch fine or delicate surfaces, like coated optics or fine wood or paint finishes. Too little nylon and the cloth will not last or clean rough surfaces without rapid deterioration. It is this perfect combination of microfiber and nylon that give these cleaning cloths their special properties.

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History of Microfiber Cloths: Part 1

April 1, 2010 | By Mandy Peterson

Although many of us use the popular 'Microfiber' material for cleaning, not too many people understand what makes it so different.

This two part segment will explain how this material is put together and exactly how it gets the job done.

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